It’s been approximately one month since Sasha had stem cell therapy and is still making steady progress. Looking back I’m happy I chose it for her. She’s still knuckling (turning toes under) on her left rear foot so I’m trying different socks and boots. However, because she’s started squatting again to go potty but hasn’t mastered a full squat, she often tinkles on her boot so they get washed and rotated .I’m still disappointed that a splint was never mentioned either following her FCE in 2011 or when she started having difficulty with impaired mobility at the start of 2016 and as a result am looking at alternate sources to discuss this with. First and foremost is Sasha’s quality of life and if a simple splint would help her then by golly she’s going to get it. Until then I’m plugging away with her extensive collection of boots and socks. You can see by this video why I call it Sasha’s Boot Emporium.

On a different note, we’re hoping that in about (3) weeks Sasha’s eyes will show some pupillary constriction when a light is focused on them as well as her far vision coming back. I’ve felt for at least a week that there are moments when she can focus but perhaps  it’s wishful thinking. She’s adapted pretty well to being blind, less bumps and better navigation in the house. I called her internist and she suggested I see one of the two surgeons in the group because they often deal with orthopedic type issues involving boots and splints.
I thought it over, called back the next day and  made an appointment for an evaluation with Dr. Marta Agrodnia, D.V.M., DACVS, a surgeon who owns the Animal Emergency Clinic in Portland and also works at Portland Veterinary Specialists (same building, under same umbrella). Dr. Agrodnia does a lot of work with animals who need supportive boots or splints so I’m hoping this is a progressive move for Sasha. While the stem cell therapy and  Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections to her knees addressed her arthritis, it can’t really help something caused by a neurological event. And the best thing is, Sasha will be seen on May 31, not too long after she’s done seeing her internist, Dr. Noble which means she doesn’t need to make another long car ride. I consulted with Dr. Agrondia once about my beloved Callie and was very pleased with the visit. 

May was an extremely rainy month so we didn’t get outside as much as I would have liked. I shot a great video of her one day in the front yard then realized I had recorded in slow motion so I took this video inside where I explain a few things (the mist is from a humidifier ~ hahahaha).

Finally! May 31 and we were off to Portland, first to see Sasha’s favorite person, Dr. Sarah Noble, then Dr. Agrodnia. She’s having lab work done so couldn’t eat breakfast which didn’t exactly thrill her. I have it with me though in a baggy along with her collapsible bowl. She’s just soaking up some rays. Long drive ahead….

May 31, 2016
Catching some rays May 31

After having a complete chemistry profile drawn to make sure her organs were functioning properly, Sasha had another EI1 panel drawn followed by her third and final injection in the Plechner Protocol. Based on the results of this EI1, she’ll either receive one more injection or if her endocrine levels are at the right number, she’ll begin oral medication in 10 days. Everyone at Portland Veterinary Specialists are absolutely wonderful to deal with and I’m so blessed to have Dr. Noble and crew on Sasha’s team. In between Sasha’s visit with Dr. Noble and the one with Dr. Agrodnia, Sasha decided to give me the silent treatment.

During the evaluation by Dr. Agrodnia I was shocked to learn that Sasha has rather severe toe arthritis! I hope that in time the SCT will help that but in the interim Sasha is on a plan of twice weekly laser treatments and Adequan injections for (3) weeks. Both the laser treatment and Adequan injection began today. She will also have acupuncture with Gary Stuer, DVM, CVA, who has his own practice in Bethel and also works one day per week in Portland with Sasha’s specialty group. Because Dr. Stuer was so booked the first available appointment isn’t until July 6. Phew!!! That’s a long wait. I can’t help but think that if her treatment plan is laser, acupuncture and Adequan injections they should be done within the same time frame to be effective. I left feeling a little unsettled because she dismissed my idea of a boot, saying this new treatment plan would be more effective. More than ever I was convinced that she needs a boot; don’t ask me why ~ I just feel it so the heat is most definitely on. ⬅︎ click here.

Sasha on the other hand looked beautiful! Blue is her color!

May 31, 2016
Beautiful in blue…💙

I’m not a savvy blogger yet so unsure of menus, icons etc. To see Sasha’s You Tube channel which chronicles her journey from onset until present day, please click here.

💜Next up ~ a lot of driving with a yard sale thrown in💜

5 thoughts on “Boots: The Heat Is On…

  1. Love the LL Bean boot! Heard they have a boot mobile that travels as an associate saw it in NYC. Have to compliment you for hyperlinking because your blog has increased my awareness of stem cell therapy in veterinary use. It actually piqued my interest as like you at first. I didn’t realize it was used by vets and I live in an urban area plus have dogs. I can feel your frustration in this post and can’t day I blame you. Sometimes I want to change PCP because more than once he has failed to inform me of a treatment or medication even when I mention it. It’s irritating to spend time & money, think your doc/vet is giving you current info only to find out later they aren’t. In Sasha’s case a splint or boot might have enabled her to retain muscle in her leg better. Sad when we the consumer have to double-check our doc/vet.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Too bad the new doc wasn’t able to help with a boot but sounds like she’s got a plan for Sasha that might work. Really happy about the acupuncture as K9 Kira gets it from time to time and we notice a difference

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s